Indie Publisher of the Week | Clare Christian, founder of RedDoor Publishing @RedDoorBooks

Clare Christian has worked for a number of large publishing houses including Hodder, Orion, John Wiley and Pearson. In 2005 she co-founded The Friday Project where she published In Search of Adam by Caroline Smailes and bestselling non-fiction Blood, Sweat and Tea: Real Life Adventures in an Inner-city Ambulance by Tom Reynolds and Confessions of a GP by Dr. Benjamin Daniels. TFP was sold to HarperCollins in 2008 and Clare stayed on until 2009 before leaving to offer publishing consultancy services under the banner of The Book Guru. She has been developing RedDoor alongside The Book Guru since January 2014. She is a past winner of the UK Young Publisher of the Year award.

Are (were) your parents great readers? Tell us a bit about yourself.
Both my parents read quite a bit, my dad reads mainly non-fiction and Mum, fiction. I read everything from a young age. We made weekly visits to the library and the nice librarian would order in books from other libraries once I had worked my way through all of the books on their shelves!

Did you want to work in the publishing industry from the start?
No, my favourite subjects at school were the sciences and English. I did a degree in Zoology and was planning a PhD but time and finances ran out and I looked to combine my love of science and my love of books and decided I would go into publishing and publish popular science books. Of course publishing doesn’t quite work like that and I am yet to publish a popular science book.
Continue reading Indie Publisher of the Week | Clare Christian, founder of RedDoor Publishing @RedDoorBooks

Author of the Week | Heidi Perks @heidiperks1

Tell us a little bit about yourself.
I am a mum of two small children and I live by the sea in Bournemouth. I spend many of the hours my children are at school writing, something I have always loved doing. Until four years ago when my youngest was born I worked in marketing. I left my job as a marketing director to spend more time with my family, and this was a perfect opportunity to start writing seriously.

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I did always want to write a book, but as a child I don’t think I actually said I’d like to be an author. As with most children I flitted through a number of ideas. I wanted to be an air hostess (even though I hate flying now), and also a nurse (I would make a dreadful nurse, I am far too squeamish.) And for quite a long time I wanted to work in fashion as I loved textiles at school.

What books have had a lasting impact on you?
From an early age anything by Enid Blyton. I fell in love with the Famous Five and Adventure series books. Also as a child I really loved Last of the Really Great Wangdoodles, which I still have for when my daughter is a little older. As an adult the first book I remember being totally impressed by was Jodi Picoult’s My Sister’s Keeper. Whilst I always loved reading this was the first one I couldn’t put down and it was a bit of a turning point for me reading the amount I now do.
Continue reading Author of the Week | Heidi Perks @heidiperks1